Wednesday, November 12, 2008

How to Make a Doggie Diaper


If you are a pet owner, there may come a time when your pet is temporarily incapacitated, suffers with a bout of diarrhea, incontinence, is a female in heat, or some other circumstance similar to one I recently faced, where you will need a pet diaper.

My experience with the specialty disposable dog diaper products are that they are pretty expensive - one brand of 12 diapers sells for $17, about $1.42 a piece - and honestly they never really fit quite right either. My dog is a lab and weighs about 60 pounds. I discovered that using a toddler pull-up style training diaper makes a perfectly acceptable substitute. I purchased a name brand pull-up diaper at $14.67 for a package of 33, which is about $0.45 a piece, a pretty significant difference. I'm sure that there are generic versions out there even less expensive.

Once you get them fitted on your dog, they will slip on and off easily for outdoor trips just like they do with children, and the fitted legs work out well on a dog also.

Now, if you are a parent you know the differences between the boys and girls diapers and training pants is the location of the padding, so you'll want to place the padding where it is needed the most. My husband picked up boys training pants this time for our girl lab, so that is what I had to use here. As you can see this White Cloud brand size 4T-5T is rated for 38 pounds or more and these are what I used on my 60 pound lab.

Instructions:

Pick up a package of disposable training pants. I didn't necessarily need this many but the rest of this supply will go to my grandson, who will soon be moving into these. You will need to estimate what size to get for your dog. As I noted, this package is rated for 38 pounds and higher and is what I used for our 60 pound lab.

You will need one diaper, a pair of scissors, and some masking tape.

Unfold the diaper.

Then fold it in half lengthwise.


Somewhere slightly above where the training pants just begins to turn is where you'll want to cut out a triangle. This will be the hole for the tail. Now, the first time you cut, you can eyeball how big to start the cut, but make it small the first time, then fit it over your dog's tail to see how much more to cut off. You can always cut more away, but you can't put it back! You may also want to lay the diaper along the back hip section of your dog the first time to sort of eyeball about where on the diaper you will need to make the tail hole. If you have purchased the boy diaper, you are going to want the thickest part of the padding (the front of the diaper) to be under your dog, not on the back.

Open the diaper and as you see, you have created this diamond shape where the tail will go. Now tear off four pieces of masking tape. You are going to use the tape to reinforce the padding where you made the cut.

Apply the tape to each side of the diamond.

Now you have a tail hole! Fasten sides together and slip the diaper onto the dog's legs, slip in the tail, adjust velcro sides to fit.

4 comments:

  1. ;) but hopefully helpful for someone too!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I came on line looking for a Hush Puppy recipe. When I saw your list of other recipes, the one called How to Make a Doggy Diaper, I envisioned a recipe something like what my mother made called Pigs in a Blanket where she rolled dough around a hot Dog and baked it in the oven. Your Doggie in a Diaper recipe I thought maybe would be a little bigger and includes beans "in the diaper" around the hot DOG- Boy, was I in for a surprise!!! This Recipe is to "Hush" the other end of the Puppy!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh LOL!! Too funny!!

    Thanks for stopping by though :)

    ReplyDelete

Welcome & thanks for taking the time to comment! From time to time, comment moderation may be activated due to comment spam. I also reserve the right to edit, delete or otherwise exercise total editorial discretion over any comments left on this blog.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE
All content and images, including any not yet watermarked, are ©My New 30 2008-2014, unless noted otherwise. You are free to print articles for personal use, but please do not republish anything from this site without prior written permission. All rights reserved.
Is someone stealing your content? Click here to find out what to do.